Newsletter Archives > Monthly Health Newsletter: January 2016 Health Newsletter

January 2016 Health Newsletter

Current Articles

» Fibromyalgia and Vitamin D
» Dr. Mania has been having fun!
» Got a question for the Doctor?
» Backpack Safety Checklist
» Change Your Diet: Why Low-Fat Diets Don't Contribute to Lifelong Weight Loss
» Why Fruit & Veggie Consumption in Young People is Important for Long-Term Health
» Ditch the Cola: How Your Favorite Sodas Can Lead to Heart Failure

Fibromyalgia and Vitamin D

Fibromyalgia and Low Vitamin D Levels

Fibromyalgia and vitamin DFibromyalgia patients are at risk of vitamin D deficiency according to a new study from Ireland. In the study, 36% of fibromyalgia patients had deficient levels of vitamin D and 62% had insufficient levels. That meant only 15% of patients were getting adequate levels of the vitamin.

The patients were mostly middle-aged women. Researchers pointed out that the women’s vitamin D levels may have been affected by the fact they live in seldom-sunny Ireland. When it is sunny, patients may still choose to stay indoors because of their disability and pain.

Low vitamin D levels can increase the risk of cognitive impairment in older adults, severe asthma in children, cancer, and more. Vitamin D helps the body maintain normal blood levels of calcium and phosphorus. It also allows the body to absorb calcium to strengthen the bones.

Previous research has investigated the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and musculoskeletal pain with conflicting results. In some studies, fibromyalgia patients had low levels of the vitamin but in others their levels were no different than control participants.  In one study vitamin D supplementation appeared to have no specific clinical benefits for fibromyalgia patients.

Still, there does appear to be link between vitamin D deficiency and muscle pain. While more research is needed to understand this link, vitamin D supplements could benefit the overall health of fibromyalgia patients.

Consult with your doctor to learn which vitamins are right for you.


Jan A, et al. “Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels in patients with fibromyalgia” BSR 2012; Abstract 231.

Walsh, Nancy. Medpage Today. Vitamin D May be Help in Fibromyalgia. May 3, 2012. Accessed May 10, 2012.

Author: Michael Melton
Source: ChiroNexus
Copyright: Michael Melton 2014

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Dr. Mania has been having fun!

Dr. Carmel-Ann Mania has been having some fun outside of the office recently...In November, she was asked to finish out a class on "Holistic Health" at the Institute for Learning in Retirement at the Bergen Community College Paramus campus. In a talk entitled Process vs. Event, she showed a class of mature learners the steps to acheiving optimum wellness throughout life. The earlier segments of the class had included a psychotherapist, acupuncturist, massage therapist, yoga teacher, nutritionist and Reiki master. Dr. Mania was able to tie in all of these health enhancing disciplines, as well as Chiropractic, into an understanding of health as a process rather than a one time event. Her talk was a fitting conclusion to the multi-week course and was very well received by the participants/students.

Dr. Mania is an experienced public speaker and teacher on Health, Stress Relief, Unwinding at Work and other topics. She also has done workshops and seminars with well known self-esteem expert Loren Gelberg-Goff with whom she authored a book titled "Being Well Within: From Distressed to De-Stressed" (Balboa Press 2011). She is available to speak to church, synagogue, civic, corporate or social groups; workshops and seminars are available through Being Well Within to corporate or private groups. You may call the office for more information 201-525-0707.

Author: Carmel-Ann Mania, D.C.
Source: Dr. Mania
Copyright: Dr. Mania 2015

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Got a question for the Doctor?

Want to know more about what Chiropractic do to help you feel stronger and be healthier? Click on the Conditions tab for research on many problems that particularly respond to Chiropractic care. Maybe you just want to see if there is something to add to your health routine? Call me at 201-525-0707 for a free 15 minute phone consultation to discuss one area that is concerning you. Tell Joan, Debi or Jolanta that you want to take me up on my complimentary offer and we will arrange a convenient time to talk.

Did you know that there are excellent exercise videos and articles on Chiropractic and health conditions on our website? Go to the homepage of and click on the Wellness Center tab. Come in for an evaluation and we can get you started on a home stretching program. Step by step instructions and clear photos and videos are available to help you achieve a better level of balance, ease and strength!

Take a few minutes to explore and like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter; rate us on Google or Yelp. We appreciate your support!

Author: Carmel-Ann Mania, D.C.
Source: Carmel-Ann Mania, D.C.
Copyright: Carmel-Ann Mania, D.C. 2017

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Backpack Safety Checklist

ACA's Backpack Safety Checklist

One of the fundamental pieces of any back to school ensemble is, of course, the backpack.  Although they’re practical, backpacks are a leading cause of back and shoulder pain for millions of children and adolescents.  As students head back to school, the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) offers parents advice on preventing unnecessary backpack pain and injuries.

The ACA offers the following checklist to help parents select the best possible backpack for their children:

  • Is the backpack the correct size for your child?  The backpack should never be wider or longer than your child’s torso, and the pack should not hang more than 4 inches below the waistline. A backpack that hangs too low increases the weight on the shoulders, causing your child to lean forward when walking.
  • Does the backpack have two wide, padded shoulder straps?  Non-padded straps are not only uncomfortable, but also they can place unnecessary pressure on the neck and shoulder muscles.
  • Does your child use both straps? Lugging a heavy backpack by one strap can cause a disproportionate shift of weight to one side, leading to neck and muscle spasms, low-back pain, and poor posture.
  • Are the shoulder straps adjustable?  The shoulder straps should be adjustable so the backpack can be fitted to your child’s body. The backpack should be evenly centered in the middle of your child's back.
  • Does the backpack have a padded back?  A padded back not only provides increased comfort, but also protects your child from being poked by sharp edges on school supplies (pencils, rulers, notebooks, etc.) inside the pack.
  • Does the pack have several compartments?  A backpack with individualized compartments helps position the contents most effectively. Make sure that pointy or bulky objects are packed away from the area that will rest on your child's back, and try to place the heaviest items closet to the body.

The ACA recommends that parents or guardians help children pack their backpacks properly, and they should make sure children never carry more than 10 percent of their body weight.  For example, a child who weighs 100 pounds shouldn’t carry a backpack heavier than 10 pounds, and a 50-pound child shouldn’t carry more than 5 pounds.

In addition, parents should ask their children to report any pain or other problems resulting from carrying a backpack. If the pain is severe or persistent, seek care from a doctor of chiropractic or other health care professional. 

Author: American Chiropractic Association
Source: ACA Website
Copyright: ACA Website 2015

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Change Your Diet: Why Low-Fat Diets Don't Contribute to Lifelong Weight Loss

A low-fat diet feels like a natural choice for losing weight, but completely eliminating certain nutrients over time may not be the answer. In fact, one study concluded that low-fat diets did not have a greater impact on weight loss than diets with higher fat contents. Of the 68,000 participants studied, low-carb diets revealed a similar average weight loss to low-fat diets, showing only a 2.5 pound increase in loss. Over time, nutrient-restricting diets like these tend to drop off after the first year, leading to little or no results. So what goes wrong?Any diet that requires the elimination of nutrients, like fat, needs to fill that void with a healthy substitute to help maintain long-term weight loss. Unfortunately, many low-fats diet programs fill that void with snacks stuffed with sodium and sugar. This can decrease the physical and mental endurance needed to sustain a successful low-fat diet over time. That's why it's important for any nutrient-restricting diet to include a healthy serving of fruits and vegetables that are rich in vitamins and minerals. This can help provide the energy and mental focus needed to sustain a successful diet over the long-term.

Source: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, online October 29, 2015.
Copyright: LLC 2016

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Why Fruit & Veggie Consumption in Young People is Important for Long-Term Health

Young people are notoriously picky about eating fruits and vegetables, but a diet packed with at least 4 servings of fruits and vegetables per day can preserve long-term cardiac health. While plenty of research on this subject has been done on the older adult population, little research was available for the 18 to 30 demographic until the CARDIA study at the Minneapolis Heart Institute. This study narrowed in on the problem of Coronary Artery Calcium, or CAC, in this age group since CAC analysis helps doctors determine if a patient is more at risk of heart failure. Starting in 1985, this program studied the fruit and vegetable intake of over 5,000 people in a 20-year period. At the conclusion of the study, participants were asked a series of questions about their dietary habits and went under CAC tomography scanning to determine the levels of artery calcium buildup. The study divided the participants into two groups; the first group had a high fruit and vegetable intake of 7 to 8 servings, and the second group had a lower intake of just 2 to 3 servings of fiber per day. Using data collected from interviews and CAC scans, researchers discovered that people with eating habits like those in the first group were less at risk of developing a CAC condition by 26%.

Source: Circulation, online October 26, 2015.
Copyright: LLC 2016

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Ditch the Cola: How Your Favorite Sodas Can Lead to Heart Failure

Sugary sodas may feel like the perfect thirst quencher, but prolonged soda consumption can actually have serious consequences in the long run. Over time, studies have shown increasing links between soda consumption and the risk for high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes, and even heart problems. In fact, one Swedish study observed the soda consumption of 42,000 men over the course of 12 years. There were roughly 3,600 new cases of heart failure during the 12-year long study, and it concluded that men who regularly drank two or more servings of soda per day had a 23% greater risk of experiencing heart failure in their lifetime.  Women are strongly advised to ditch the soda as well. Long-term soda consumption in women has been strongly linked to a rise in insulin problems, high blood pressure, obesity, and type-2 diabetes, all of which are triggers for major heart problems. Heart failure occurs when the heart does not have the strength to pump enough oxygen and blood. 23 million people across the globe already deal with heart failure, and it will only continue to worsen with the regular consumption of processed foods, sodium, and sugary beverages like soda.

Source: Heart, online November 2, 2015.
Copyright: LLC 2016

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