Newsletter Archives > Monthly Health Newsletter: December 2015 Health Newsletter

December 2015 Health Newsletter

Current Articles

» Dr. Mania has been having fun!
» Fibromyalgia and Vitamin D
» Got a question for the Doctor?
» Backpack Safety Checklist
» Avoiding the Headaches of the Season
» Curb the Bacon: Why Your Favorite Processed Meats Might Lead to Cancer
» Why is USA's Prescription Drug Use on the Rise?
» Why Decreasing Sleep Interruptions Improves Your Mood

Dr. Mania has been having fun!

Dr. Carmel-Ann Mania has been having some fun outside of the office recently...In November, she was asked to finish out a class on "Holistic Health" at the Institute for Learning in Retirement at the Bergen Community College Paramus campus. In a talk entitled Process vs. Event, she showed a class of mature learners the steps to acheiving optimum wellness throughout life. The earlier segments of the class had included a psychotherapist, acupuncturist, massage therapist, yoga teacher, nutritionist and Reiki master. Dr. Mania was able to tie in all of these health enhancing disciplines, as well as Chiropractic, into an understanding of health as a process rather than a one time event. Her talk was a fitting conclusion to the multi-week course and was very well received by the participants/students.

Dr. Mania is an experienced public speaker and teacher on Health, Stress Relief, Unwinding at Work and other topics. She also has done workshops and seminars with well known self-esteem expert Loren Gelberg-Goff with whom she authored a book titled "Being Well Within: From Distressed to De-Stressed" (Balboa Press 2011). She is available to speak to church, synagogue, civic, corporate or social groups; workshops and seminars are available through Being Well Within to corporate or private groups. You may call the office for more information 201-525-0707.

Author: Carmel-Ann Mania, D.C.
Source: Dr. Mania
Copyright: Dr. Mania 2015

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Fibromyalgia and Vitamin D

Fibromyalgia and Low Vitamin D Levels

Fibromyalgia and vitamin DFibromyalgia patients are at risk of vitamin D deficiency according to a new study from Ireland. In the study, 36% of fibromyalgia patients had deficient levels of vitamin D and 62% had insufficient levels. That meant only 15% of patients were getting adequate levels of the vitamin.

The patients were mostly middle-aged women. Researchers pointed out that the women’s vitamin D levels may have been affected by the fact they live in seldom-sunny Ireland. When it is sunny, patients may still choose to stay indoors because of their disability and pain.

Low vitamin D levels can increase the risk of cognitive impairment in older adults, severe asthma in children, cancer, and more. Vitamin D helps the body maintain normal blood levels of calcium and phosphorus. It also allows the body to absorb calcium to strengthen the bones.

Previous research has investigated the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and musculoskeletal pain with conflicting results. In some studies, fibromyalgia patients had low levels of the vitamin but in others their levels were no different than control participants.  In one study vitamin D supplementation appeared to have no specific clinical benefits for fibromyalgia patients.

Still, there does appear to be link between vitamin D deficiency and muscle pain. While more research is needed to understand this link, vitamin D supplements could benefit the overall health of fibromyalgia patients.

Consult with your doctor to learn which vitamins are right for you.


Jan A, et al. “Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels in patients with fibromyalgia” BSR 2012; Abstract 231.

Walsh, Nancy. Medpage Today. Vitamin D May be Help in Fibromyalgia. May 3, 2012. Accessed May 10, 2012.

Author: Michael Melton
Source: ChiroNexus
Copyright: Michael Melton 2014

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Got a question for the Doctor?

Want to know more about what Chiropractic do to help you feel stronger and be healthier? Click on the Conditions tab for research on many problems that particularly respond to Chiropractic care. Maybe you just want to see if there is something to add to your health routine? Call me at 201-525-0707 for a free 15 minute phone consultation to discuss one area that is concerning you. Tell Joan, Debi or Jolanta that you want to take me up on my complimentary offer and we will arrange a convenient time to talk.

Did you know that there are excellent exercise videos and articles on Chiropractic and health conditions on our website? Go to the homepage of and click on the Wellness Center tab. Come in for an evaluation and we can get you started on a home stretching program. Step by step instructions and clear photos and videos are available to help you achieve a better level of balance, ease and strength!

Take a few minutes to explore and like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter; rate us on Google or Yelp. We appreciate your support!

Author: Carmel-Ann Mania, D.C.
Source: Carmel-Ann Mania, D.C.
Copyright: Carmel-Ann Mania, D.C. 2017

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Backpack Safety Checklist

ACA's Backpack Safety Checklist

One of the fundamental pieces of any back to school ensemble is, of course, the backpack.  Although they’re practical, backpacks are a leading cause of back and shoulder pain for millions of children and adolescents.  As students head back to school, the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) offers parents advice on preventing unnecessary backpack pain and injuries.

The ACA offers the following checklist to help parents select the best possible backpack for their children:

  • Is the backpack the correct size for your child?  The backpack should never be wider or longer than your child’s torso, and the pack should not hang more than 4 inches below the waistline. A backpack that hangs too low increases the weight on the shoulders, causing your child to lean forward when walking.
  • Does the backpack have two wide, padded shoulder straps?  Non-padded straps are not only uncomfortable, but also they can place unnecessary pressure on the neck and shoulder muscles.
  • Does your child use both straps? Lugging a heavy backpack by one strap can cause a disproportionate shift of weight to one side, leading to neck and muscle spasms, low-back pain, and poor posture.
  • Are the shoulder straps adjustable?  The shoulder straps should be adjustable so the backpack can be fitted to your child’s body. The backpack should be evenly centered in the middle of your child's back.
  • Does the backpack have a padded back?  A padded back not only provides increased comfort, but also protects your child from being poked by sharp edges on school supplies (pencils, rulers, notebooks, etc.) inside the pack.
  • Does the pack have several compartments?  A backpack with individualized compartments helps position the contents most effectively. Make sure that pointy or bulky objects are packed away from the area that will rest on your child's back, and try to place the heaviest items closet to the body.

The ACA recommends that parents or guardians help children pack their backpacks properly, and they should make sure children never carry more than 10 percent of their body weight.  For example, a child who weighs 100 pounds shouldn’t carry a backpack heavier than 10 pounds, and a 50-pound child shouldn’t carry more than 5 pounds.

In addition, parents should ask their children to report any pain or other problems resulting from carrying a backpack. If the pain is severe or persistent, seek care from a doctor of chiropractic or other health care professional. 

Author: American Chiropractic Association
Source: ACA Website
Copyright: ACA Website 2015

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Avoiding the Headaches of the Season

With the holidays upon us, headaches become very common. To avoid headaches, the following is recommended:

  • If you spend a long amount of time in one fixed position (ie in front of a computer), take a break and stretch every 30 minutes to one hour.
  • Avoid teeth clenching as this can lead to TMJ and tension headaches.
  • Drink at least 8 glasses of water a day to avoid dehydration that causes headaches.
  • Engage in low impact exercise to relieve the pain associated with primary headaches.

If headaches are chronic and persist, visit your doctor of chiropractic for treatment. He or she can provide the right course of treatment through spinal adjustments, dietary changes, and give advice on exercises, posture or relaxation techniques.

Source: American Chiropractic Association
Copyright: 2002

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Curb the Bacon: Why Your Favorite Processed Meats Might Lead to Cancer

Experts have been debating bacon for years, but could this delicious food really lead to cancer? According to a study by the World Health Organization (WHO), there's a link between the regular consumption of bacon, along with other processed meats like hot dogs, and the risk for contracting colorectal cancer, which is cancer of the bowels.  WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer also found a link between prolonged processed meat consumption and the risk for both pancreatic and prostate cancer as well. The IARC report estimated that for every 1.8 ounce of bacon consumed per day, the risk for bowel cancer rises by 18%. The findings from this report led WHO to deem processed meats as true carcinogens, just like tobacco. But not everyone is buying the argument that processed meat is as bad as tobacco. Almost a million deaths a year are caused by smoking cigarettes. While experts agree that over consumption of processed meats isn't healthy, bacon and other meats can be enjoyed in moderation without concern according to the National Resources Defense Council. The advocacy group also urges people to avoid the processed meat section and to buy fresh meat from high-quality sources instead.

Source: Reuters. October 27, 2015.
Copyright: LLC 2015

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Why is USA's Prescription Drug Use on the Rise?

Prescription drug use is a phenomenon that will continue to rise with the regular introduction of new pharmaceutical drugs. One study set out to find why prescription drug use rose by 8% percentage points with adults in 10 years. The NHANES study surveyed around 37,000 people, aged 20 and above, in the United States. Over a course of 30 days, participants were asked a series of questions about their prescription drug use habits. Researchers found that the increase in prescription drug use was much greater among the age 40 and older demographic. It's important to look at the type of prescription drugs being used by adults as well. The NHANES study discovered a general increase in prescriptions for depression, blood pressure, and cholesterol problems. One professor from the University of Illinois pointed out that an increase in prescription drug use isn't necessarily an indication of something wrong. However, we disagree. Increasing usage of prescription drugs is an indication that society is continuing to become less healthy and is putting more and more emphasis on a passive fix rather than making more natural and simple lifestyle changes such as positive dietary and physical activity changes. In fact, depression, blood pressure and cholesterol levels can all be positively influenced with rather basic changes to diet and implementation of an exercise regime.

Source: JAMA, online November 3, 2015.
Copyright: LLC 2015

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Why Decreasing Sleep Interruptions Improves Your Mood

It's always encouraged to get a full 8 hours of sleep, but the quality of that sleep is just as important. Waking up repeatedly throughout the night can put anyone in a bad mood the next morning, but one study set out to prove that disrupted sleep indeed causes mood problems. A research group from John Hopkin's University enlisted 62 individuals with no known sleep issues to participate in a special lab study. The participants were assigned a different kind of situation by random; either sporadically interrupted sleep times, continuous interrupted sleep, or sleep with no interruptions whatsoever.  Each group was given the same amount of time to sleep. By the end of the study, researchers concluded that it was a combination of both the time put into sleep and whether or not the individual was disrupted. Participants who were occasionally disturbed or completely interrupted while sleeping experienced far less moments of actual "deep" sleep, which in turn led to a negative mood the following morning. Participants who lacked sleep also reported to have less energy overall, a lack of friendliness toward others, and a decrease in empathetic feelings.

Source: Sleep, online November 1, 2015.
Copyright: LLC 2015

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