Newsletter Archives > Monthly Health Newsletter: November 2015 Health Newsletter

November 2015 Health Newsletter

Current Articles

» Fibromyalgia and Vitamin D
» Got a question for the Doctor?
» Backpack Safety Checklist
» Get Some Sleep: How Bad Sleeping Habits Are Hurting Your Health
» The Power of Pets: How Furry Friends Can Lower a Child's Risk for Asthma
» Why California is Considering Red Meat as a True Cancer Risk

Fibromyalgia and Vitamin D

Fibromyalgia and Low Vitamin D Levels

Fibromyalgia and vitamin DFibromyalgia patients are at risk of vitamin D deficiency according to a new study from Ireland. In the study, 36% of fibromyalgia patients had deficient levels of vitamin D and 62% had insufficient levels. That meant only 15% of patients were getting adequate levels of the vitamin.

The patients were mostly middle-aged women. Researchers pointed out that the women’s vitamin D levels may have been affected by the fact they live in seldom-sunny Ireland. When it is sunny, patients may still choose to stay indoors because of their disability and pain.

Low vitamin D levels can increase the risk of cognitive impairment in older adults, severe asthma in children, cancer, and more. Vitamin D helps the body maintain normal blood levels of calcium and phosphorus. It also allows the body to absorb calcium to strengthen the bones.

Previous research has investigated the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and musculoskeletal pain with conflicting results. In some studies, fibromyalgia patients had low levels of the vitamin but in others their levels were no different than control participants.  In one study vitamin D supplementation appeared to have no specific clinical benefits for fibromyalgia patients.

Still, there does appear to be link between vitamin D deficiency and muscle pain. While more research is needed to understand this link, vitamin D supplements could benefit the overall health of fibromyalgia patients.

Consult with your doctor to learn which vitamins are right for you.


Jan A, et al. “Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels in patients with fibromyalgia” BSR 2012; Abstract 231.

Walsh, Nancy. Medpage Today. Vitamin D May be Help in Fibromyalgia. May 3, 2012. Accessed May 10, 2012.

Author: Michael Melton
Source: ChiroNexus
Copyright: Michael Melton 2014

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Got a question for the Doctor?

Want to know more about what Chiropractic do to help you feel stronger and be healthier? Click on the Conditions tab for research on many problems that particularly respond to Chiropractic care. Maybe you just want to see if there is something to add to your health routine? Call me at 201-525-0707 for a free 15 minute phone consultation to discuss one area that is concerning you. Tell Joan, Debi or Jolanta that you want to take me up on my complimentary offer and we will arrange a convenient time to talk.

Did you know that there are excellent exercise videos and articles on Chiropractic and health conditions on our website? Go to the homepage of and click on the Wellness Center tab. Come in for an evaluation and we can get you started on a home stretching program. Step by step instructions and clear photos and videos are available to help you achieve a better level of balance, ease and strength!

Take a few minutes to explore and like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter; rate us on Google or Yelp. We appreciate your support!

Author: Carmel-Ann Mania, D.C.
Source: Carmel-Ann Mania, D.C.
Copyright: Carmel-Ann Mania, D.C. 2017

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Backpack Safety Checklist

ACA's Backpack Safety Checklist

One of the fundamental pieces of any back to school ensemble is, of course, the backpack.  Although they’re practical, backpacks are a leading cause of back and shoulder pain for millions of children and adolescents.  As students head back to school, the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) offers parents advice on preventing unnecessary backpack pain and injuries.

The ACA offers the following checklist to help parents select the best possible backpack for their children:

  • Is the backpack the correct size for your child?  The backpack should never be wider or longer than your child’s torso, and the pack should not hang more than 4 inches below the waistline. A backpack that hangs too low increases the weight on the shoulders, causing your child to lean forward when walking.
  • Does the backpack have two wide, padded shoulder straps?  Non-padded straps are not only uncomfortable, but also they can place unnecessary pressure on the neck and shoulder muscles.
  • Does your child use both straps? Lugging a heavy backpack by one strap can cause a disproportionate shift of weight to one side, leading to neck and muscle spasms, low-back pain, and poor posture.
  • Are the shoulder straps adjustable?  The shoulder straps should be adjustable so the backpack can be fitted to your child’s body. The backpack should be evenly centered in the middle of your child's back.
  • Does the backpack have a padded back?  A padded back not only provides increased comfort, but also protects your child from being poked by sharp edges on school supplies (pencils, rulers, notebooks, etc.) inside the pack.
  • Does the pack have several compartments?  A backpack with individualized compartments helps position the contents most effectively. Make sure that pointy or bulky objects are packed away from the area that will rest on your child's back, and try to place the heaviest items closet to the body.

The ACA recommends that parents or guardians help children pack their backpacks properly, and they should make sure children never carry more than 10 percent of their body weight.  For example, a child who weighs 100 pounds shouldn’t carry a backpack heavier than 10 pounds, and a 50-pound child shouldn’t carry more than 5 pounds.

In addition, parents should ask their children to report any pain or other problems resulting from carrying a backpack. If the pain is severe or persistent, seek care from a doctor of chiropractic or other health care professional. 

Author: American Chiropractic Association
Source: ACA Website
Copyright: ACA Website 2015

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Get Some Sleep: How Bad Sleeping Habits Are Hurting Your Health

Life gets in the way, so the importance of getting a full 8 hours of sleep can often fall by the wayside. While it may not feel as important in the short-term, a lack of sleep can have major consequences in the long run. In fact, studies show that consistently getting less than 6 hours of sleep per night can help trigger a serious condition called metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is the term given to a set of 5 specific health conditions.

  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • High blood sugar
  • Extra mid-section fat
  • Excess fat in the blood

These conditions are all proven triggers for such serious health problems as heart disease and diabetes. A lack of sleep has been shown to increase high blood pressure by over 55% and increase the chances of high blood sugar by 30% in adults. A Korean medical study observed roughly 2,600 participants for two years and also discovered that people who had received less than 6 hours of sleep in those two years were at a greater risk for developing metabolic syndrome by more than 40%. To help combat the long-term consequences of bad sleep habits, doctors recommend that patients analyze their daily routine and see if they're scheduling sleep out of their lives.

Source: Sleep, online September 25, 2015.
Copyright: LLC 2015

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The Power of Pets: How Furry Friends Can Lower a Child's Risk for Asthma
While new parents often consider giving their dog to grandma, studies suggest that raising children with pets may actually have a positive effect on their health after all. In fact, one Swedish study found that children living with farm animals were nearly 52% less at risk of developing Asthma. This result came from a 10-year long study that observed roughly 276,000 children aged 3 years and up. Of this group, over 22,000 included children who were raised with dogs any time during their first year. Out of the entire group studied, only 11,500 children developed asthma in their lives, and researchers found that children who were raised with farm animals or dogs since birth were half as likely to develop asthma in their life.  One of the study's researchers from Sweden's Uppsala University suggested that living with pets and farm animals can potentially increase a child's immune system. Allergy researchers from the University of Washington also suggest that not only do pets get kids out into the fresh air, but certain animals may also have been exposed to a bacterium that protects them against getting Asthma.

Source: JAMA Pediatrics, online November 2, 2015.
Copyright: LLC 2015

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Why California is Considering Red Meat as a True Cancer Risk
There have been numerous studies linking red meat to cancer, but one report by the World Health Organization may have persuaded California to change its mind about meat. California has been a leader in discussions about GMO food labeling and humane agricultural practices. One of California's most important consumer-based policies is Proposition 65. Signed into law in 1986, this measure requires California to retain a database of all substances that are known to be triggers for cancer. Companies that use these substances are then required to disclose that information to consumers on their product labels. Since the WHO report categorizes processed meat as a carcinogen, not unlike tobacco, it puts the meat industry in a very precarious position in the state.  While some believe California may lead toward putting red meat, particularly processed meat, on the cancer risk alert list, the meat industry remains confident that they have enough leverage to not adhere to California's policy. In 2009, a California court reaffirmed that meat factories are not subject to state inspection if they're already inspected by the federal government. Thus, the meat industry may get to escape California's risk list after all. However, processed meats may still be in a position for cancer risk labeling since it's not a fresh meat.

Source: Reuters, online October 28, 2015.
Copyright: LLC 2015

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