Newsletter Archives > ChiroPlanet.com Monthly Health Newsletter: October 2015 Health Newsletter

October 2015 Health Newsletter


Current Articles

» Backpack Safety Checklist
» Fibromyalgia and Vitamin D
» Got a question for the Doctor?
» Study Reveals Majority of U.S. Adults Inclined to Visit a Chiropractor
» For Better Lipid Levels, Encourage Kids and Adults to Consume Fewer Sugary Drink
» One-Third of Cases of Diabetes in the U.S. are Undiagnosed

Backpack Safety Checklist

ACA's Backpack Safety Checklist

One of the fundamental pieces of any back to school ensemble is, of course, the backpack.  Although they’re practical, backpacks are a leading cause of back and shoulder pain for millions of children and adolescents.  As students head back to school, the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) offers parents advice on preventing unnecessary backpack pain and injuries.

The ACA offers the following checklist to help parents select the best possible backpack for their children:

  • Is the backpack the correct size for your child?  The backpack should never be wider or longer than your child’s torso, and the pack should not hang more than 4 inches below the waistline. A backpack that hangs too low increases the weight on the shoulders, causing your child to lean forward when walking.
  • Does the backpack have two wide, padded shoulder straps?  Non-padded straps are not only uncomfortable, but also they can place unnecessary pressure on the neck and shoulder muscles.
  • Does your child use both straps? Lugging a heavy backpack by one strap can cause a disproportionate shift of weight to one side, leading to neck and muscle spasms, low-back pain, and poor posture.
  • Are the shoulder straps adjustable?  The shoulder straps should be adjustable so the backpack can be fitted to your child’s body. The backpack should be evenly centered in the middle of your child's back.
  • Does the backpack have a padded back?  A padded back not only provides increased comfort, but also protects your child from being poked by sharp edges on school supplies (pencils, rulers, notebooks, etc.) inside the pack.
  • Does the pack have several compartments?  A backpack with individualized compartments helps position the contents most effectively. Make sure that pointy or bulky objects are packed away from the area that will rest on your child's back, and try to place the heaviest items closet to the body.

The ACA recommends that parents or guardians help children pack their backpacks properly, and they should make sure children never carry more than 10 percent of their body weight.  For example, a child who weighs 100 pounds shouldn’t carry a backpack heavier than 10 pounds, and a 50-pound child shouldn’t carry more than 5 pounds.

In addition, parents should ask their children to report any pain or other problems resulting from carrying a backpack. If the pain is severe or persistent, seek care from a doctor of chiropractic or other health care professional. 

Author: American Chiropractic Association
Source: ACA Website
Copyright: ACA Website 2015


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Fibromyalgia and Vitamin D

Fibromyalgia and Low Vitamin D Levels

Fibromyalgia and vitamin DFibromyalgia patients are at risk of vitamin D deficiency according to a new study from Ireland. In the study, 36% of fibromyalgia patients had deficient levels of vitamin D and 62% had insufficient levels. That meant only 15% of patients were getting adequate levels of the vitamin.

The patients were mostly middle-aged women. Researchers pointed out that the women’s vitamin D levels may have been affected by the fact they live in seldom-sunny Ireland. When it is sunny, patients may still choose to stay indoors because of their disability and pain.

Low vitamin D levels can increase the risk of cognitive impairment in older adults, severe asthma in children, cancer, and more. Vitamin D helps the body maintain normal blood levels of calcium and phosphorus. It also allows the body to absorb calcium to strengthen the bones.

Previous research has investigated the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and musculoskeletal pain with conflicting results. In some studies, fibromyalgia patients had low levels of the vitamin but in others their levels were no different than control participants.  In one study vitamin D supplementation appeared to have no specific clinical benefits for fibromyalgia patients.

Still, there does appear to be link between vitamin D deficiency and muscle pain. While more research is needed to understand this link, vitamin D supplements could benefit the overall health of fibromyalgia patients.

Consult with your doctor to learn which vitamins are right for you.

References

Jan A, et al. “Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels in patients with fibromyalgia” BSR 2012; Abstract 231.

Walsh, Nancy. Medpage Today. Vitamin D May be Help in Fibromyalgia. May 3, 2012. Accessed May 10, 2012. http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/BSR/32497.

Author: Michael Melton
Source: ChiroNexus
Copyright: Michael Melton 2014


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Got a question for the Doctor?


Want to know more about what Chiropractic do to help you feel stronger and be healthier? Click on the Conditions tab for research on many problems that particularly respond to Chiropractic care. Maybe you just want to see if there is something to add to your health routine? Call me at 201-525-0707 for a free 15 minute phone consultation to discuss one area that is concerning you. Tell Joan, Debi or Jolanta that you want to take me up on my complimentary offer and we will arrange a convenient time to talk.

Did you know that there are excellent exercise videos and articles on Chiropractic and health conditions on our website? Go to the homepage of DrMania.com and click on the Wellness Center tab. Come in for an evaluation and we can get you started on a home stretching program. Step by step instructions and clear photos and videos are available to help you achieve a better level of balance, ease and strength!

Take a few minutes to explore DrMania.com and like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter; rate us on Google or Yelp. We appreciate your support!

Author: Carmel-Ann Mania, D.C.
Source: Carmel-Ann Mania, D.C.
Copyright: Carmel-Ann Mania, D.C. 2017


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Study Reveals Majority of U.S. Adults Inclined to Visit a Chiropractor

Millions of U.S. adults would choose chiropractic care first to treat neck or back pain, according to a 2014 nationwide survey. The Gallup-Palmer report revealed 57% of all U.S. adults believe in the effectiveness of treatment and are likely to visit a chiropractor. Over 50% of adults have visited a chiropractic doctor in the past, and over 25% would choose a chiropractor over any other type of doctor if they experienced back or neck pain. The nationally representative survey, commissioned by the Palmer College of Chiropractic in Iowa, also found that more adults are seeking chiropractic treatment than previously estimated. The survey found that 33.6 million Americans visited a chiropractor in 2014, up from the 2012 estimate of 20.6 million Americans. Chiropractic care takes a trained, conservative approach to the treatment of neuromusculoskeltal concerns, limiting the need for prescription painkillers or surgery. However, about four in ten U.S. adults reported concerns about cost, and nearly half did not know whether their insurance plan covered chiropractic services. According to the American Chiropractic Association (ACA), numerous recent studies refute these misconceptions. The ACA reports that chiropractic care is at least partially covered by most insurance plans and is considered a cost-effective form of treatment for back and neck pain.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Acatoday.org, online September 08, 2015
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2015


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For Better Lipid Levels, Encourage Kids and Adults to Consume Fewer Sugary Drink

Children may not know the difference between "good" and "bad" cholesterol, but both parents and children should understand that habits formed in childhood could have lasting effects on their health. A recent study found that children who lowered their intake of sugary drinks by at least one serving per week over a 12-month period increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL), known as the good cholesterol that supports heart health. The yearlong study, performed by researchers at Tufts University in Boston, gathered results from 690 children in the area, with 380 completed questionnaire responses by the twelfth month. The 690 preliminary questionnaires were given to children between ages 8 and 15, 85% of who stated they had consumed sugary beverages such as sodas, fruit juices and sweet tea over the past week. Nearly 20% reported consuming at least one sugary beverage each day. The study found that older children and those with a lower socioeconomic background tended to consume more sugary beverages. The children who drank sweetened beverages tended to consume more total calories, but fewer fruits and vegetables, and be more sedentary. Other studies have suggested that decreasing sugar intake in adults can also lower triglyceride levels, which is a contributing cause of heart disease.


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: The Journal of Nutrition, online September 2, 2015.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2015


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One-Third of Cases of Diabetes in the U.S. are Undiagnosed

Advanced screening for diabetes has helped detect cases early on, but new research suggests that over a third of cases in adults still go undiagnosed. A team of researchers led by Andy Menke at Social and Scientific Systems in Maryland studied National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 1988-2010 and 2011-2012. About one in nine adults has been diagnosed with diabetes, which, according to the World Health Organization, will be the seventh-leading cause of death by 2030. Untreated diabetes can lead to a myriad of health problems, including nerve damage, amputations, strokes and heart disease. Blood tests help detect diabetes by tracking average blood sugar levels and calculating the percentage of hemoglobin that is coated with sugar. Despite the availability of these tests, researchers state that more than half of cases in Hispanic and Asian individuals go undetected. Could better education be the key to early detection of diabetes and pre-diabetes? Risk factors include obesity and family history of the disease. Although research indicated that fewer individuals are undiagnosed now than in the past, individuals who are considered high-risk should be screened earlier and more often.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: 
JAMA, online September 8, 2015.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2015


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